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PRI's Environmental News Magazine

The Sound Ring

 

Maya Lin’s Sound Ring—a large, wooden sculpture installed at Cornell’s Lab of Ornithology—plays the sounds of species and habitats that are on their way to silence. Emmett Fitzgerald talks to John Fitzpatrick, Director of Cornell’s Lab of Ornithology about the structure and the significance of these endangered soundscapes.

 

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American Catch

 

Though commercial fishing is a multi-billion dollar business in America, the country’s seafood supply is slipping from American hands with much of the catch headed overseas. Paul Greenberg, author of the new book American Catch, tells us about the unraveling of America’s seafood industry and what can be done to save it.

 

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Tibetan Monks Saving Snow Leopards

 

Snow Leopards are among the most endangered of the world’s big cats, but now Tibetan monks are giving the leopard hope. (Camera trap photo of a snow leopard on the Tibetan plateau (photo: Panthera))

 

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Baby Polar Bear Rescue

 

Climate Change is making life difficult for polar bears across the world. But an orphaned Alaska bear cub is about to get a new home, and a new sibling, at the Buffalo Zoo in upstate New York.

 

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Bayou Community Struggles with Sinkhole

 

A huge sinkhole in the tiny swamp community of Bayou Corne is giving residents unique and unpleasant challenges. It is now approximately 20 acres in size.

 

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Jim's Bees

 

Bees have remarkable skills to communicate and create wholesome food from flowers. Yet they can also terrify.

 

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Ancient Underwater Forest in the Gulf of Mexico

 

Sixty feet beneath the water off the coast of Alabama is a forest of cypress trees that is more than 50,000 years old.

 

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The Great Lakes and Climate Change

 

In the last 30 years the largest fresh water lake in the world in terms of surface area, Lake Superior, has warmed nearly six degrees Fahrenheight. The increased temperature is a boon to some fish but warmer water is also more suitable for some species.

 

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Migrations Off Schedule

 

The monarch butterflies are late, the wildebeest have turned around, and the North Atlantic right whales are missing. What’s going on with the world’s great animal migrations?

 

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Ecology and the Deadly Ebola Epidemic

West Africa is the middle of the worst Ebola outbreak in recorded world history. There have been over 3,000 reported cases and the death toll is now over 1,550. We delve into the epidemic, the prospects of a vaccine and how habitat loss may be one reason why we are seeing so many diseases jumping from animals to humans in recent years.

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Scotland Launches the World's Largest Tidal Power Project

Scotland is a world leader in tidal and wave power research and hopes to produce all of its energy from sustainable low-carbon sources by 2020. Calum Davidson, the Director of Energy and Low Carbon with Scotland’s Highlands and Islands Enterprise explains their novel project to install the world’s largest tidal turbine array and how will help supply green energy to the U.K. and Europe.

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The Sound Ring

Maya Lin’s Sound Ring—a large, wooden sculpture installed at Cornell’s Lab of Ornithology—plays the sounds of species and habitats that are on their way to silence. Emmett Fitzgerald talks to John Fitzpatrick, Director of Cornell’s Lab of Ornithology about the structure and the significance of these endangered soundscapes.

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This Week’s Show
August 29, 2014
listen / download


Ecology and the Deadly Ebola Epidemic

listen / download
West Africa is the middle of the worst Ebola outbreak in recorded world history. There have been over 3,000 reported cases and the death toll is now over 1,550. We delve into the epidemic, the prospects of a vaccine and how habitat loss may be one reason why we are seeing so many diseases jumping from animals to humans in recent years.

Scottish Independence from High-Carbon Energy and the U.K.

listen / download
As Scots get ready to vote on whether or not to leave the United Kingdom and become independent, Scotland’s future is in flux, especially with regards to its ambitious climate goals and huge renewable energy potential that conflict with plans to extract billions of barrels of oil and gas from the North Sea. We spoke with WWF Scotland’s Director, Lang Banks, about the future of Scotland’s energy and how independence might affect it.

Scotland Launches the World's Largest Tidal Power Project

listen / download
Scotland is a world leader in tidal and wave power research and hopes to produce all of its energy from sustainable low-carbon sources by 2020. Calum Davidson, the Director of Energy and Low Carbon with Scotland’s Highlands and Islands Enterprise explains their novel project to install the world’s largest tidal turbine array and how will help supply green energy to the U.K. and Europe.

Whither the Union Jack?

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With Scotland set to vote on its independence, Living on Earth’s resident British producer Helen Palmer asks what might happen to the iconic Union Jack flag if Great Britain were to lose the Scots.

Beyond the Headlines

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Canaries in the coalmine aren’t the only birds to warn us of danger. In this week’s look Beyond the Headlines, Peter Dykstra tells us about how sick birds can show signs of environmental hazards. He also reports ravens are coming back to New York City and remembers the last known passenger pigeon.

The Sound Ring

listen / download
Maya Lin’s Sound Ring—a large, wooden sculpture installed at Cornell’s Lab of Ornithology—plays the sounds of species and habitats that are on their way to silence. Emmett Fitzgerald talks to John Fitzpatrick, Director of Cornell’s Lab of Ornithology about the structure and the significance of these endangered soundscapes.

Bats Seeking Water

listen / download
For thirsty bats in the Madera Canyon, the quest for water is everything. Writer Mark Seth Lender watches in pitch blackness as bats drink from a desert pool.


Special Features

Listener Haikus
To honor Earth Day 2014 we asked you - our listeners - to tap your own creative muse and send us your haiku. The topic could be anything Earth Day inspired. The response was tremendous. In fact, we received more haiku than we could put on the air. Fortunately we can share them with you here.
Blog Series: Living on Earth

Arctic Reveal
Mark Seth Lender makes it to Greenland in his second dispatch from the arctic for Adventure Canada.
Blog Series: Mark Seth Lender: Farthest North


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"One of the things in childhood that seems to shape environmental behaviors in adulthood is parents taking their kids mushroom picking and berry picking: selecting a natural resource for consumption seems to be something that leads to environmental behavior in adulthood."

-- David Sobel Professor of Environmental Studies at Antioch University

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