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PRI's Environmental News Magazine

Wilderness Act at 50

 

September 2014 marks the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act. American nature writer Jordan Fisher Smith talks about the Wilderness Act and how the concept of wilderness is evolving and paradoxical.

 

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Prosecutor Defends Climate Action Civil Disobedience

 

On May 15, 2013, two Massachusetts climate activists used a lobster boat to block a ship carrying coal from reaching the Brayton Point power plant. With years in prison on the line, District Attorney Samuel Sutter shocked everyone by dropping the criminal charges and declaring climate change one of the gravest crises our world has ever seen.

 

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Cape Wind in Doubt

 

Wind turbines in the Irish Sea. The United States has yet to establish offshore wind, but countries in Europe have taken the plunge (photo: Andy Dingley)

 

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White House Confronts Climate Deniers

 

Some skeptical pundits have used the recent deep cold snap to suggest that climate change isn’t real. White House Science Advisor John Holdren says not so fast.

 

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Otters and Climate Change

 

Sea Otters are known for their playful demeanor and cuddly appearance, but scientists at the University of California at Santa Cruz think that the cuddly creatures could help reduce the amount of carbon in the atmosphere. (Photo: Imtiaz333 Flickr Creative Commons)

 

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Climate Change and Sea Level Rise

 

New research finds that every 1 degree Celsius of temperature rise eventually equates to 2.3 meters of sea level rise. Anders Levermann tells host Steve Curwood about the expectations for sea level rise over the next 2,000 years.

 

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Beyond the Headlines

 

Peter Dykstra of the Daily Climate and Environmental Health News brings us some far-flung environmental stories from this past week that didn’t make the headlines. This week: salt intrusion in Bangladesh and rare earth mining in Greenland.

 

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Bayou Community Struggles with Sinkhole

 

A huge sinkhole in the tiny swamp community of Bayou Corne is giving residents unique and unpleasant challenges. It is now approximately 20 acres in size.

 

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Nicaraguan Canal

 

The first ships sailed down the Panama Canal in 1914. Now, nearly one hundred years later, Nicaragua has an agreement with a Chinese company to build a canal of its own to link the Pacific and Atlantic. (photo: Tim Rogers)

 

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Prosecutor Defends Climate Action Civil Disobedience

On May 15, 2013, two Massachusetts climate activists used a lobster boat to block a ship carrying coal from reaching the Brayton Point power plant. With years in prison on the line, District Attorney Samuel Sutter shocked everyone by dropping the criminal charges and declaring climate change one of the gravest crises our world has ever seen.

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Wilderness Act at 50

September 2014 marks the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act. American nature writer Jordan Fisher Smith talks about the Wilderness Act and how the concept of wilderness is evolving and paradoxical.

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Organic-Friendly Weed Blaster

Researchers at the USDA have developed new technology to combat weeds on organic farms. The Forcella Weed Blaster is a modified sand blaster that utilizes high-velocity grit to fertilize and weed crop rows simultaneously.

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This Week’s Show
September 12, 2014
listen / download


Prosecutor Defends Climate Action Civil Disobedience

listen / download
On May 15, 2013, two Massachusetts climate activists used a lobster boat to block a ship carrying coal from reaching the Brayton Point power plant. With years in prison on the line, District Attorney Samuel Sutter shocked everyone by dropping the criminal charges and declaring climate change one of the gravest crises our world has ever seen.

Wilderness Act at 50

listen / download
September 2014 marks the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act. American nature writer Jordan Fisher Smith talks about the Wilderness Act and how the concept of wilderness is evolving and paradoxical.

A Fight for New Wilderness

listen / download
Despite the 1964 Wilderness Act, Congress, local opposition and special interest groups are making it increasingly harder to pass wilderness bills, which would legally protect federal lands from development, but advocates in Southeast Oregon continues to fight for wilderness designation for Owyhee Canyon lands. Cassandra Profita from EarthFix reports.

Beyond the Headlines

listen / download
In this week’s trip beyond the headlines, Peter Dykstra speaks about how living near green spaces positively impacts newborns’ health; also how invasive algae rock snot is spreading and journalists are pressuring the Canadian government; and remembering 1999’s Hurricane Floyd and the Hog Waste Crisis.

British Petroleum Guilty of Gross Negligence

listen / download
A judge recently ruled that BP acted with gross negligence of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, meaning it may have to pay as much as $18 billion dollars of additional fines. We sat down with Vermont Law School's Peter Parenteau to wade through the legal speak and discuss what the ruling means.

Organic-Friendly Weed Blaster

listen / download
Researchers at the USDA have developed new technology to combat weeds on organic farms. The Forcella Weed Blaster is a modified sand blaster that utilizes high-velocity grit to fertilize and weed crop rows simultaneously.

BirdNote® Bushtit - A Very Tiny Songbird

listen / download
Mary McCann observes sprightly bushtits as they hang upside-down from branches to feed on insects under leaves and tweet constantly as they fly in flocks of 30 or more from bush to bush.


Special Features

Listener Haikus
To honor Earth Day 2014 we asked you - our listeners - to tap your own creative muse and send us your haiku. The topic could be anything Earth Day inspired. The response was tremendous. In fact, we received more haiku than we could put on the air. Fortunately we can share them with you here.
Blog Series: Living on Earth

Arctic Reveal
Mark Seth Lender makes it to Greenland in his second dispatch from the arctic for Adventure Canada.
Blog Series: Mark Seth Lender: Farthest North


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"One of the things in childhood that seems to shape environmental behaviors in adulthood is parents taking their kids mushroom picking and berry picking: selecting a natural resource for consumption seems to be something that leads to environmental behavior in adulthood."

-- David Sobel Professor of Environmental Studies at Antioch University

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