• picture
  • picture
PRI's Environmental News Magazine

Canals in Boston?

 

Boston is one of the most vulnerable cities in the world to sea level rise, so urban planners in Boston are looking at ways the city can adapt its infrastructure to accommodate rising tides. One idea could turn Boston's historic Back Bay neighborhood into the next Venice or Amsterdam.

 

Read More »

icon

Danish Green Roofs

 

Copenhagen, the capital of Denmark, was named Europe’s greenest capital in 2014. It’s partly due to the ubiquitous bike paths and the ambitious renewable energy goals, but as Living on Earth’s Helen Palmer reports, it's also due to the many green roofs the city is installing to soak up excess rain and cool the capital.

 

Read More »

icon

Australia May Scrap Carbon Tax

 

China is the world’s largest emitter, and much of its coal comes from Australia. With the election of a new Prime Minister, Australia looks set to revoke its carbon tax, leaving many environmentalists worried about their country’s contribution to climate change. (photo: Bigstockphoto.com)

 

Read More »

icon

Hummingbirds Citizen Science Project

 

The Rufous hummingbird follows the Rocky Mountains to migrate from Alaska to Mexico (Photo: Diana Douglas for Hummingbirds at Home).

 

Read More »

icon

Deepwater Disaster Three Years On

 

Just three years ago, the Deep Water Horizon oil spill poured 200 million gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. Now, a team of chemists, engineers, and biologists is attempting to assess the damage to the Gulf ecosystem.

 

Read More »

icon

Nicaraguan Canal

 

The first ships sailed down the Panama Canal in 1914. Now, nearly one hundred years later, Nicaragua has an agreement with a Chinese company to build a canal of its own to link the Pacific and Atlantic. (photo: Tim Rogers)

 

Read More »

icon

Tibetan Monks Saving Snow Leopards

 

Snow Leopards are among the most endangered of the world’s big cats, but now Tibetan monks are giving the leopard hope. (Camera trap photo of a snow leopard on the Tibetan plateau (photo: Panthera))

 

Read More »

icon

Migrations Off Schedule

 

The monarch butterflies are late, the wildebeest have turned around, and the North Atlantic right whales are missing. What’s going on with the world’s great animal migrations?

 

Read More »

icon

Nuclear Storage Crisis

 

The meltdown at Fukushima in Japan may be grabbing all the headlines, but with the Yucca Mountain project in perpetual limbo the United States has a nuclear storage problem on its hands as well.

 

Read More »

icon

Urban Acupuncture To Cure City Ills

Curitiba, Brazil has been called “the best planned city in the world.” Former mayor Jaime Lerner changed how the city deals with waste, cleaned up the streets, and overhauled the city’s public transit system, all on a shoestring budget. He says that you don’t need lots of money to make cities more livable, socially just, and environmentally friendly. All it takes is a pinprick.

picture

Building Complete Streets

Post World War II’s infrastructure boom demanded roads with wide lanes and high speed limits for large-volumes of motor vehicles moving goods and were unfriendly to pedestrians and bicyclers in populated areas. Jake Lucas reports that now more than ever, cities are designing streets with people in mind, following the principles of “Complete Streets.” In Boston’s Allston neighborhood, there’s a street where that transformation is underway.

picture

Canals in Boston?

Boston is one of the most vulnerable cities in the world to sea level rise, so urban planners in Boston are looking at ways the city can adapt its infrastructure to accommodate rising tides. One idea could turn Boston's historic Back Bay neighborhood into the next Venice or Amsterdam.

picture

This Week’s Show
November 28, 2014
listen / download


The Best and Worst Cities Preparing For Climate Change

listen / download
Global warming is presenting cities around the world with challenges ranging from drought to storms to rising sea levels. OnEarth Editor Jeff Turrentine discusses which cities are doing the most to prepare climate change, and which cities have yet to plan ahead.

Car-Free To Become Carefree In Helsinki

listen / download
Helsinki is developing "mobility as a service" to deal with growing traffic congestion. A smart phone app can instantly figure out the best way to to get from one place to another, using shared and public transportation and a single billing system. Helsinki’s Director of Transport and Traffic Planning Ville Lehmuskoski discusses how investing in shared modes of transport based on situational needs means fewer people will feel they need a private automobile.

Danish Green Roofs

listen / download
Copenhagen, the capital of Denmark, was named Europe’s greenest capital in 2014. It’s partly due to the ubiquitous bike paths and the ambitious renewable energy goals, but as Living on Earth’s Helen Palmer reports, it's also due to the many green roofs the city is installing to soak up excess rain and cool the capital.

Urban Acupuncture To Cure City Ills

listen / download
Curitiba, Brazil has been called “the best planned city in the world.” Former mayor Jaime Lerner changed how the city deals with waste, cleaned up the streets, and overhauled the city’s public transit system, all on a shoestring budget. He says that you don’t need lots of money to make cities more livable, socially just, and environmentally friendly. All it takes is a pinprick.

Building Complete Streets

listen / download
Post World War II’s infrastructure boom demanded roads with wide lanes and high speed limits for large-volumes of motor vehicles moving goods and were unfriendly to pedestrians and bicyclers in populated areas. Jake Lucas reports that now more than ever, cities are designing streets with people in mind, following the principles of “Complete Streets.” In Boston’s Allston neighborhood, there’s a street where that transformation is underway.

Canals in Boston?

listen / download
Boston is one of the most vulnerable cities in the world to sea level rise, so urban planners in Boston are looking at ways the city can adapt its infrastructure to accommodate rising tides. One idea could turn Boston's historic Back Bay neighborhood into the next Venice or Amsterdam.


Special Features

Listener Haikus
To honor Earth Day 2014 we asked you - our listeners - to tap your own creative muse and send us your haiku. The topic could be anything Earth Day inspired. The response was tremendous. In fact, we received more haiku than we could put on the air. Fortunately we can share them with you here.
Blog Series: Living on Earth

Arctic Reveal
Mark Seth Lender makes it to Greenland in his second dispatch from the arctic for Adventure Canada.
Blog Series: Mark Seth Lender: Farthest North


picture

Imagine being in a cathedral with stained glass windows and there's light dancing through the stained glass windows onto the floor, and that's what it looks like underwater in a kelp forest. These beautiful amber blades that...the sunlight...dances through on the bottom of the ocean.

-- Nancy Caruso, Marine Biologist and Get Inspired! Founder

Donate to Living on Earth!
Living on Earth is an independent media program and relies entirely on contributions from listeners and institutions supporting public service. Please donate now to preserve an independent environmental voice.

Newsletter
Living on Earth offers a weekly delivery of the show's rundown to your mailbox. Sign up for our newsletter today!

Major funding for Living on Earth is provided by the National Science Foundation.

Committed to healthy food, healthy people, a healthy planet, and healthy business.

Innovating to make the world a better, more sustainable place to live.

Kendeda Fund, furthering the values that contribute to a healthy planet.

The Grantham Foundation for the Protection of the Environment: Committed to protecting and improving the health of the global environment.

Contribute to Living on Earth and receive, as our gift to you, an autographed copy of one of Mark Seth Lender's extraordinary hummingbird photographs. Follow the link to see Mark's current collection of photographs.