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PRI's Environmental News Magazine

Climate Change and Sea Level Rise

 

New research finds that every 1 degree Celsius of temperature rise eventually equates to 2.3 meters of sea level rise. Anders Levermann tells host Steve Curwood about the expectations for sea level rise over the next 2,000 years.

 

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Migrations Off Schedule

 

The monarch butterflies are late, the wildebeest have turned around, and the North Atlantic right whales are missing. What’s going on with the world’s great animal migrations?

 

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Russia Nixes Antarctic Marine Reserve

 

Negotiators from 25 countries met in Germany recently in a bid to create a massive marine reserve in the seas around Antarctica. But at the last minute, Russia backed out of the deal.

 

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Jim's Bees

 

Bees have remarkable skills to communicate and create wholesome food from flowers. Yet they can also terrify.

 

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Climate Departure Date

 

A group of scientists at the University of Hawaii have figured out a way to project when the climate at a given location will move outside the range of anything we’ve known in modern times. It’s sooner then you think.

 

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Deepwater Disaster Three Years On

 

Just three years ago, the Deep Water Horizon oil spill poured 200 million gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. Now, a team of chemists, engineers, and biologists is attempting to assess the damage to the Gulf ecosystem.

 

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Australia May Scrap Carbon Tax

 

China is the world’s largest emitter, and much of its coal comes from Australia. With the election of a new Prime Minister, Australia looks set to revoke its carbon tax, leaving many environmentalists worried about their country’s contribution to climate change. (photo: Bigstockphoto.com)

 

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Prairie Rattlesnake

 

A few months ago writer Mark Seth Lender met his first Prairie Rattlesnake up close and personal, and found the snake fascinating, and though venomous, not a threat.

 

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Bayou Community Struggles with Sinkhole

 

A huge sinkhole in the tiny swamp community of Bayou Corne is giving residents unique and unpleasant challenges. It is now approximately 20 acres in size.

 

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Pesticides Can Lower Intelligence

Studies conducted in the Salinas Valley and New York City have found that the effects of pesticides on development in children can be similar to those of lead. Journalist Susan Freinkel published her investigation in The Nation, which outlines developmental problems found, including lower IQ’s and slower mobility.

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The Growing Threat From Methane

There's more than twice as much of the powerful greenhouse gas methane in the earth's atmosphere as before the industrial era, and continued warming promises escalating emissions.

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Greening the Web

If the Internet were a country, it would be the sixth largest consumer of electricity in the world. Now Greenpeace has released a new report detailing which tech companies are using renewable energy to power their servers.

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This Week’s Show
April 11, 2014
listen / download


Pesticides Can Lower Intelligence

listen / download
Studies conducted in the Salinas Valley and New York City have found that the effects of pesticides on development in children can be similar to those of lead. Journalist Susan Freinkel published her investigation in The Nation, which outlines developmental problems found, including lower IQ’s and slower mobility.

Hydropower Overload In China

listen / download
China has built nearly 2 dams per day since the Communist party took over in1949. Now China has plans ramp up hydroelectric dam installation in Yunnan Province, putting at risk this biodiversity hotspot in Southwest China.

Greening the Web

listen / download
If the Internet were a country, it would be the sixth largest consumer of electricity in the world. Now Greenpeace has released a new report detailing which tech companies are using renewable energy to power their servers.

The Growing Threat From Methane

listen / download
There's more than twice as much of the powerful greenhouse gas methane in the earth's atmosphere as before the industrial era, and continued warming promises escalating emissions.

Send Us Your Haiku -Listener Letters

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We dip into the Living on Earth mailbag to hear from you our listeners, also a shout out for environmental haikus in honor of Earth Day this month.

Beyond the Headlines

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In this week’s trip beyond the headlines, Peter Dykstra tells us about a multibillion-dollar settlement with a major US energy company, and a questions about a class of molecules in cleaning agents called quats.

Sea Star Mystery

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Biologists are investigating a deadly disease that's killing many starfish, mostly on the US Pacific coast.

New Species Discovered Under Ice

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The Upside Down Sea Anemones: Frank Rack, Executive Director of the U.S. Antarctic Geological Drilling team, talks about how the team discovered a new species of sea anemones that hang upside down in ice in the Ross Ice Shelf.

Searching Out the Arctic Fox

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Greenland’s west coast looks barren and foreboding, but on a recent trip to Greenland, Mark Seth Lender found signs of life.


Special Features

En Route
Writer Mark Seth Lender has been travelling on the edge of the arctic, thanks to Adventure Canada -- and writing of his experiences. Here's the blog he sent us.
Blog Series: Mark Seth Lender: Farthest North

Eat-A-Bug Cookbook Recipes

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Not only should we consider eating insects for environmental reasons; they can also be tasty. David George Gordon has just released an updated version of his Eat-A-Bug Cookbook, brimming with recipes that feature crickets, grasshoppers, ants, spiders, centipedes, and their kin. Here are a few choice recipes.
Blog Series: Cooking on Earth


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"One of the things in childhood that seems to shape environmental behaviors in adulthood is parents taking their kids mushroom picking and berry picking: selecting a natural resource for consumption seems to be something that leads to environmental behavior in adulthood."

-- David Sobel Professor of Environmental Studies at Antioch University

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