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PRI's Environmental News Magazine

Life For A Humpback Whale

 

Mark Seth Lender has followed humpback whales throughout the northern hemisphere, in the Atlantic, the Pacific and in the Arctic Ocean. He stopped by Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary on the New England coast, to visit with a Humpback whale and her calf.

 

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Years of Living Dangerously

 

Hollywood director and producer James Cameron was a key part of a team that produced a non-fiction documentary series on climate change for cable TV, “Years of Living Dangerously.” Celebrities and journalists covered the globe confronting government officials and leaders about climate change and the need for positive actions. Cameron spoke with us about how the series was made for TV and his climate-friendly approach for his upcoming production of sequels to Avatar.

 

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Migrations Off Schedule

 

The monarch butterflies are late, the wildebeest have turned around, and the North Atlantic right whales are missing. What’s going on with the world’s great animal migrations?

 

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Deepwater Disaster Three Years On

 

Just three years ago, the Deep Water Horizon oil spill poured 200 million gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. Now, a team of chemists, engineers, and biologists is attempting to assess the damage to the Gulf ecosystem.

 

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Otters and Climate Change

 

Sea Otters are known for their playful demeanor and cuddly appearance, but scientists at the University of California at Santa Cruz think that the cuddly creatures could help reduce the amount of carbon in the atmosphere. (Photo: Imtiaz333 Flickr Creative Commons)

 

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Ancient Underwater Forest in the Gulf of Mexico

 

Sixty feet beneath the water off the coast of Alabama is a forest of cypress trees that is more than 50,000 years old.

 

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The Great Lakes and Climate Change

 

In the last 30 years the largest fresh water lake in the world in terms of surface area, Lake Superior, has warmed nearly six degrees Fahrenheight. The increased temperature is a boon to some fish but warmer water is also more suitable for some species.

 

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Russia Nixes Antarctic Marine Reserve

 

Negotiators from 25 countries met in Germany recently in a bid to create a massive marine reserve in the seas around Antarctica. But at the last minute, Russia backed out of the deal.

 

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Romance and Spring Harvest At Paradise Lot

 

For most gardeners, springtime means a few seedlings on a window sill. But for perennial gardeners spring is a time of harvest. The new book, Paradise Lot, is a personal and heartwarming account of finding romance and growing a permaculture food forest on a degraded backyard plot in a gritty neighborhood of Holyoke, MA.

 

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Companies Pulling Out of Canadian Tar Sands Oil

With oil prices declining and the future of the Keystone XL pipeline in doubt, some energy companies are scrapping plans to invest in tar sands oil.

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Methane Hotspot Seen from Space

Using satellites, scientists at NASA and the University of Michigan found an unusually large methane hotspot over the Four Corners region of the United States in the desert Southwest. Christian Frankenberg of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory talks about the unexpected finding and its likely source.

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A Man, His Clarinet and Nature’s Singers

David Rothenberg is in search of an interspecies moment. With his clarinet in hand, the professor of music and philosophy at the New Jersey Institute of Technology plays along with birds, bugs and whales, hoping to discover something beyond the world of human music. Rothenberg spoke with us from his home studio about why animals make music and why he makes music with them.

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This Week’s Show
October 17, 2014
listen / download


Companies Pulling Out of Canadian Tar Sands Oil

listen / download
With oil prices declining and the future of the Keystone XL pipeline in doubt, some energy companies are scrapping plans to invest in tar sands oil.

Methane Hotspot Seen from Space

listen / download
Using satellites, scientists at NASA and the University of Michigan found an unusually large methane hotspot over the Four Corners region of the United States in the desert Southwest. Christian Frankenberg of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory talks about the unexpected finding and its likely source.

Cap and Trade Heats Up Pennsylvania Gubernatorial Race

listen / download
Under the EPA’s proposed rules states have to cut carbon dioxide emissions by 2030, but Pennsylvania gubernatorial candidates disagree on how to do it. Allegheny Front’s Julie Grant reports that one candidate favors joining the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative would help meet these goals, but his opponent and Pennsylvania’s coal power industry says no.

Beyond the Headlines

listen / download
In this week’s trip between the headlines, Peter Dykstra tells us about a scathing report about the Canadian government’s environmental shortfalls from the Canadian government itself, the value of clean water and the invention of nylon stockings.

Controversial Japanese Whaling

listen / download
Whaling around the world has reduced populations to a fraction of their original size, and all but three nations have stopped this practice. Phillip Clapham of NOAA’s National Marine Mammal Laboratory discusses Japan’s motives to continue whaling in the face of international disapproval.

Life For A Humpback Whale

listen / download
Mark Seth Lender has followed humpback whales throughout the northern hemisphere, in the Atlantic, the Pacific and in the Arctic Ocean. He stopped by Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary on the New England coast, to visit with a Humpback whale and her calf.

A Man, His Clarinet and Nature’s Singers

listen / download
David Rothenberg is in search of an interspecies moment. With his clarinet in hand, the professor of music and philosophy at the New Jersey Institute of Technology plays along with birds, bugs and whales, hoping to discover something beyond the world of human music. Rothenberg spoke with us from his home studio about why animals make music and why he makes music with them.


Special Features

Listener Haikus
To honor Earth Day 2014 we asked you - our listeners - to tap your own creative muse and send us your haiku. The topic could be anything Earth Day inspired. The response was tremendous. In fact, we received more haiku than we could put on the air. Fortunately we can share them with you here.
Blog Series: Living on Earth

Arctic Reveal
Mark Seth Lender makes it to Greenland in his second dispatch from the arctic for Adventure Canada.
Blog Series: Mark Seth Lender: Farthest North


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“Every time we throw away food in the United States, that’s food that was grown somewhere on this planet for us…There’s a huge amount of this resource consumption that is driving deforestation that is driving species decline.”

-- Keya Chatterjee, Director of Renewable Energy and Footprint Outreach at WWF

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