• picture
  • picture
PRI's Environmental News Magazine

Business Note

Air Date: Week of February 22, 2002

stream/download this segment as an MP3 file

Living on Earth’s Jennifer Chu reports on a certain white fish you won’t be seeing anytime soon on some Bay Area menus.

Transcript

CURWOOD: Just ahead "Buffalo for the Broken Heart," a new book from author Dan O'Brien. First, this environmental Business Note from Jennifer Chu.

[THEME MUSIC]

CHU: Take a pass on the Chilean sea bass, is the new motto for some Bay area restaurants these days. Trendy eateries like Chez Panisse and The French Laundry are bumping the popular white fish from their menus, to try to save it from extinction. Chilean sea bass is what's known as white gold in the fishing industry, and has been making a splash on American menus for the past ten years. But, due to increasing consumer demand, the tasty fish have been overfished. Under the Antarctic Treaty System fishers are allowed to catch up to 19,000 tons of Chilean sea bass each year. But pirate fishers have illegally caught and sold more than 49,000 tons a year, since 1997. That's about two-and-a-half times the legal limits. To complicate matters further, the bass, also known as Patagonian toothfish, takes as long as ten years to reach reproductive age, which makes it even harder for the species to keep up with the fishing industry. Scientists now predict that the fish will be completely depleted in the next two years. So far, 65 San Francisco restaurants have pledged to keep Chilean sea bass off the menu for the next five years, when, hopefully, its numbers bounce back. That's this week's Business Note. I'm Jennifer Chu.

CURWOOD: And you're listening to Living on Earth.

[MUSIC: Anouar Brahem Trio, "Astrakan Cafe (2)", ASTRAKAN CAFE (ECM - 2000)]

 

 

Living on Earth wants to hear from you!

P.O. Box 990007
Prudential Station
Boston, MA, USA 02199
Telephone: 1-617-287-4121
E-mail: comments@loe.org

Donate to Living on Earth!
Living on Earth is an independent media program and relies entirely on contributions from listeners and institutions supporting public service. Please donate now to preserve an independent environmental voice.

Newsletter
Living on Earth offers a weekly delivery of the show's rundown to your mailbox. Sign up for our newsletter today!

Major funding for Living on Earth is provided by the National Science Foundation.

Committed to healthy food, healthy people, a healthy planet, and healthy business.

Innovating to make the world a better, more sustainable place to live.

Kendeda Fund, furthering the values that contribute to a healthy planet.

The Grantham Foundation for the Protection of the Environment: Committed to protecting and improving the health of the global environment.

Contribute to Living on Earth and receive, as our gift to you, an archival print of one of Mark Seth Lender's extraordinary hummingbird photographs. Follow the link to see Mark's current collection of photographs.