• picture
  • picture
PRI's Environmental News Magazine

Health Update

Air Date: Week of March 2, 2001

stream/download this segment as an MP3 file

Transcript

TOOMEY: When it comes to fish, leaner is not necessarily healthier. A new study has found that among the elderly, eating fatty fish lowers the risk of dying from a heart attack. The findings mirror studies done on middle-aged adults. For seven years researchers followed the eating habits of nearly 4,000 people over the age of 65. They found that folks who ate fatty fish at least once a week had a 44 percent lower risk of dying from a heart attack. The reason: Fatty fish contain high levels of Omega-3 fatty acids, and Omega-3s are thought to prevent irregular heart rhythms, which can lead to heart failure. Types of fatty fish include tuna, salmon, and mackerel. Researchers say lean fish, such as cod, catfish, and snapper, did not offer similar protection from heart attacks. That's this week's health update. I'm Diane Toomey.

CURWOOD: And you're listening to Living on Earth.

(Music up and under: Jeff Fahey, "Steel Guitar Rag")

 

 

Living on Earth wants to hear from you!

P.O. Box 990007
Prudential Station
Boston, MA, USA 02199
Telephone: 1-617-287-4121
E-mail: comments@loe.org

Donate to Living on Earth!
Living on Earth is an independent media program and relies entirely on contributions from listeners and institutions supporting public service. Please donate now to preserve an independent environmental voice.

Newsletter
Living on Earth offers a weekly delivery of the show's rundown to your mailbox. Sign up for our newsletter today!

Major funding for Living on Earth is provided by the National Science Foundation.

Committed to healthy food, healthy people, a healthy planet, and healthy business.

Innovating to make the world a better, more sustainable place to live.

Kendeda Fund, furthering the values that contribute to a healthy planet.

The Grantham Foundation for the Protection of the Environment: Committed to protecting and improving the health of the global environment.

Contribute to Living on Earth and receive, as our gift to you, an archival print of one of Mark Seth Lender's extraordinary hummingbird photographs. Follow the link to see Mark's current collection of photographs.