• picture
  • picture
PRI's Environmental News Magazine

The Living on Earth Almanac

Air Date: Week of June 30, 2000

This week, facts about sea turtles. It’s the tenth anniversary of a conservation program that’s trying to save the endangered species.

Transcript

CURWOOD: Green Sea Turtles have something to celebrate this fourth of July. It's the tenth anniversary of Hawaii's Mauna Lani turtle restoration program that breeds Honu, or Green Sea turtles, for release into the ocean. The Green Sea Turtle is one of seven marine turtle species. All are endangered and it's not hard to see why. For one thing, newly hatched turtles wait for the cover of darkness to dash for the sea. They are programmed to head for the brightest spot. In nature, that's the horizon over the ocean but with development, they head for bright lights on shore instead and never find the water. For those that do, other hazards await. The palm sized hatchlings are extremely vulnerable to predators. And then: plastic bags. In the water, plastic bags look like jelly fish, a baby sea turtle's favorite food. But, eat them and die. Between predators and pollution, only five percent of any given population are left after a couple of weeks. And then accidental capture during net fishing means death for thousands more each year. But if all does go well, sea turtles can live as long as 100 years. So, best of luck to this year's batch, who brave the elements of man and mother nature on Turtle Independence Day, July 4th. And for this week, that's the Living on Earth Almanac.

 

 

Living on Earth wants to hear from you!

P.O. Box 990007
Prudential Station
Boston, MA, USA 02199
Telephone: 1-617-287-4121
E-mail: comments@loe.org

Donate to Living on Earth!
Living on Earth is an independent media program and relies entirely on contributions from listeners and institutions supporting public service. Please donate now to preserve an independent environmental voice.

Newsletter
Living on Earth offers a weekly delivery of the show's rundown to your mailbox. Sign up for our newsletter today!

Major funding for Living on Earth is provided by the National Science Foundation.

Committed to healthy food, healthy people, a healthy planet, and healthy business.

Innovating to make the world a better, more sustainable place to live.

Kendeda Fund, furthering the values that contribute to a healthy planet.

The Grantham Foundation for the Protection of the Environment: Committed to protecting and improving the health of the global environment.

Contribute to Living on Earth and receive, as our gift to you, an archival print of one of Mark Seth Lender's extraordinary hummingbird photographs. Follow the link to see Mark's current collection of photographs.