• picture
  • picture
PRI's Environmental News Magazine

Health Update

Air Date: Week of January 12, 2001

stream/download this segment as an MP3 file

Transcript

TOOMEY: It's been announced that a three-month-old rhesus monkey is the world's first genetically-modified primate. A simple genetic marker was inserted into ANDi when he was still an unfertilized egg. The name ANDi is DNA spelled backwards plus the letter "i" for "insert." The technique, called germ-line engineering, involves genetically modifying sperm or egg cells, and could produce primates that carry genes associated with specific medical conditions. For example, researchers could insert a gene associated with Alzheimer's and use the animal and its offspring to test vaccines against that condition. But the possibility of human germ-line engineering remains controversial. Critics say it opens up the use of genetic engineering to enhance desirable characteristics or create so-called super-beings. That's this week's health update. I'm Diane Toomey.

(Music up and under)

CURWOOD: And you're listening to Living on Earth.

(Music up and under)

 

 

Living on Earth wants to hear from you!

P.O. Box 990007
Prudential Station
Boston, MA, USA 02199
Telephone: 1-617-287-4121
E-mail: comments@loe.org

Donate to Living on Earth!
Living on Earth is an independent media program and relies entirely on contributions from listeners and institutions supporting public service. Please donate now to preserve an independent environmental voice.

Newsletter
Living on Earth offers a weekly delivery of the show's rundown to your mailbox. Sign up for our newsletter today!

Major funding for Living on Earth is provided by the National Science Foundation.

Committed to healthy food, healthy people, a healthy planet, and healthy business.

Innovating to make the world a better, more sustainable place to live.

Kendeda Fund, furthering the values that contribute to a healthy planet.

The Grantham Foundation for the Protection of the Environment: Committed to protecting and improving the health of the global environment.

Contribute to Living on Earth and receive, as our gift to you, an archival print of one of Mark Seth Lender's extraordinary hummingbird photographs. Follow the link to see Mark's current collection of photographs.